The Recording Industry in Numbers: A record label centered view of recorded music

The following is an academic essay that I wrote about the recording industry. Rather than publishing it through peer-review journals, I decided to release it to everyone. Please have a look and let me know what you think. It is particularly important because of the newly proposed copyright law. What it shows is that the trade organizations such as the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and the International Federation of Phonographic Industries (IFPI) are very candid with regard to to the way they aim to change the industry. Please read and let’s start a conversation about the impact of the proposed copyright law. Continue reading

Grammy Alliance: Another Round of Piracy Panic Narrative

video blockedAfter 3 hours of music and a much needed public service announcement on domestic violence, the Recording Academy decided to end the show with a selfish lobbying effort to create tougher copyright laws. By starting the Creators’ Alliance (dubbed #GrammyAlliance for Twitter), the Recording Academy placed itself strongly on the side of major record labels against the recording artists who constitute the bulk of the Recording Academy members. Continue reading

Major Record Labels Sell More Music as the Album Declines

Record-Album-02Album sales are down. But that really isn’t the point. Albums were the logical result of the available recording technology. At first, recorded music was limited by the “brevity dictated by the size of the shellac plate.” In other words, the length of a song was limited to the length of a side of a 78-rpm record, which for a while was about 3 minutes. The album only developed as a concept with the 33 1/3-rpm LP record, which could initially hold 22 minutes of music per side. Rather than lengthening a song, record companies began bundling 3 minute songs together in the form of an album. With digital music, it does not necessarily make sense for record labels to produce albums if they can release digital tracks. Continue reading